A Short Conversation with Hisano

After the success of our very own Chief Creative Officer’s showing at the Las Vegas JCK Jewelry show, we decided to create a short video in which she shares her inspiration and process behind her International Award Winning Pearl Geode and Finestrino Collection.

We hope you enjoy!

A Pearly Rose Gold Renaissance

You may have noticed a trend building if you are a fan of fine jewelry …


Pearl Paradise Rose Gold Jewelry

A collection of a few of our favorite ROSE gold pieces

It’s gorgeous!!!

Now what exactly is it and why is it pink???

Gold is an AMAZING metal. It has been considered valuable and precious since long before the beginning of recorded history, and for good reason!

Gold’s Amazing Properties

Gold can be hammered so thin, that one ounce of it (about the size of a quarter) can be turned into a sheet measuring roughly 300 square feet! One ounce of gold can also be stretched into a wire so thin (only five microns thick), that it would reach a distance of 50 miles!

Gold is one of the least chemically reactive elements, which is why it doesn’t easily rust or tarnish. Gold is also one of the best conductors of electricity and heat, making it extremely important in advanced computers. Gold strongly reflects infrared radiation, and because gold leaf can be beaten thin enough to become transparent, it is used in astronauts’ helmets. Modern space exploration would not be possible without gold!

Gold’s Amazing Color

Most pure metals are gray or silvery white, while gold is a deep, rich yellow. Adding small amounts of other metals can dramatically change its color. Mix gold with some palladium and nickel and you’ve got white gold. Mix gold with silver and you’ve got green gold. Mix it with aluminum and you get purple gold (though it is too brittle for jewelry). And my favorite, mix it with copper and silver and you get ROSE GOLD!


Rose gold, also known as pink gold and red gold, has been part of gold’s history from the start.  During ancient times, due to impurities in the smelting process, gold frequently turned a reddish color. In fact, many texts from the Middle Ages, describe the color of gold as red.

Rose gold jewelry gained popularity in Russia at the beginning of the nineteenth century, due to its distinctly different look from yellow or white gold. Rose gold jewelry first became popular in the United States in 1924, after Louis Cartier introduced his “Trinity” ring, which consisted of three interlocking bands of white, yellow and, you guessed it, rose gold!

Rose gold has continued to gain popularity for numerous reasons. The hue of rose gold looks great with pretty much every skin tone. It also finds favor with those who generally would only wear white gold, or only wear yellow gold, because it looks beautiful when worn alongside either gold color. Rose gold also has the added benefit of not containing nickel, which can cause an allergic reaction with some people.

We here at Pearl Paradise are proud to be able to offer a great many of our designs in rose gold! This is because the vast majority of our jewelry is made in-house. In fact, Pearl Paradise arguably has the largest selection of rose gold pearl jewelry on the internet! To showcase our collection, we’ve added a Rose Gold Jewelry page to our website, where every design on the page is available in rose gold!



Rose gold settings with Tahitian pearls, South Sea pearls and metallic freshwaters


Tahitian Harvest Strands

Two months ago I received the first request for a Tahitian “Harvest” strand. It’s something we’ve been encouraged to make for some time, but there are usually so many different things I “want” to work on and I rarely get to them all.

It was decided by the team that we would make a few of these strands for the September Connoisseur event, so when a request came in for something special in July, I decided to take the reigns personally. Fast-forward two months later and I believe we’ve made a total of 22 strands, and I’ve personally made most of them.

What is trending as a “harvest strand” is a strand of pearls that represents what one would expect to find in a real pearl harvest. When you can appreciate the beauty of one of these strands, it’s even easier to appreciate the effort put in to grow these pearls and match them into graded strands.

Three-row Tahitian pearl harvest strand Sep 11 2014 lp copy

Finding a three-strand clasp that would work for something this massive is not an easy task so we did the only thing we could – make a clasp from scratch. On a good note, however, this gave us the ability to customize it and add an extender so the strand can be worn short or long with all the pearls showing. You probably noticed the space between the strands above as well. This is so when the strand is being worn long, the inner strands don’t overtake the outer and overlap.

Three-row Tahitian harvest

And just for fun, I made one “harvest” strand of freshwater pearls just to see how it would come out. I used a lot of really special keshi, metallics, ripples and even souffle pearls in this one. It was a fun piece.

Freshwater Harvest Strand

I am thinking of hanging up the harvest strand hat for a while, but my good friend Josh Humbert of Kamoka Pearls had a good idea when he was here last month — a vault strand. Now that could get dangerous!

Hisano and I are hopping on a plane to Hong Kong and should be airborne within the hour!

Two special pearl commissions

Most of the pearl pieces we make on a daily basis are to us somewhat routine. We know the most popular sizes, lengths and styles and these account for probably 95% of what we ship on a weekly basis. But those that really know us also know that we love to create special pieces. Lately these have been pieces created from unique pearls Hisano and I find while pearl hunting in Asia, but often they are pieces that are a new take on the traditional.

This week we received two such commissions. The first was for a special Tahitian pearl strand and the second was for a very particular style of white South Sea.

This Tahitian strand is special. The request was 36 inches, AAA quality, straight-sized without graduation, exotic colors and matched across as closely as possible – the latter being the most difficult part of all, and one we called upon friends in Tahiti for a bit of assistance. Matching exotic colors across is the near equivalent of 36 inches of paired, exotic Tahitians.

36 inches of exotic Tahitian pearls

The result is one dramatic strand of incredibly exotic Tahitian pearls.  These colors are the reason I love working with Tahitians.

An exotic Tahitian pearl rope

36 inches of exotic, 11-12 mm Tahitian pearls

The second special strand is one that I handled personally this week. A customer in Australia asked our assistance in creating a special white South Sea strand for his 25th anniversary. He wanted the piece to be very special, so we decided to create a strand out of our loose pearl inventory – the pearls we set aside for rings, earrings and pendants. As I blogged about last year, this is the way to create the perfect strand.

But simply matching a South Sea strand out of loose grade pearls is not something terribly out of the ordinary for us. What makes this strand so different is the graduation.

We were discussing possible graduations (going minimum or dramatic) and I mentioned how dramatic the graduation was in the necklace featured in The Dark Man Rises. I remembered Ashley of Pure Pearls recently blogged about one, combining freshwater pearls with white South Sea. We decided to give it a shot – using only white South Sea pearls.

The resulting strand is a perfect 8.5 to 13.1 mm strand of top-grade selected pearls. We finished the necklace with a gold clasp engraved with a special, 25th anniversary message and it’s now headed over the pond tonight.

graduated white South Sea strand

A perfect strand of graduated white South Sea pearls

Nontraditional Tahitian pearl pairing that works

Baroque Tahitian pearls are among my favorites. The best tend to have colors and combinations of colors within individual pearls that are nearly impossible to achieve with traditional rounds. The uniqueness of each pearl means that a full strand can never be perfectly duplicated (hence the need for individual photographs) and pairs are very difficult to make.

A good customer reached out to me earlier in the month and asked me to find a pair of Tahitians on the smaller side that had amazing colors. While I could have selected something extra special from the rounds, my first thought was to suggest a pair of drops or baroques. We had just finished separating a large lot of Tahitian pearls for the holiday season and I had set a few special lots aside.

Baroque Tahitian pearls with intense colors

My suggestion of using colorful baroque pearls was well-received but created a dilemma; she only wore stud earrings and drops and circled pearls are traditionally set onto dangle settings. We decided to try something more nontraditional and find pairs that would work set as studs.

An intense blue-green pair and a super-peacock pair.

Blue Green and Super Peacock Tahitian pearl baroque pairs

A pair with color so intense, the oil-slick effect is visible on the pearls

Oil slick peacock colors on a Tahitian pearl

I ended up matching a couple of pairs of drops too, and while the colors were striking, I had to recommend going with one of the less symmetrical pairs.

Given that her two favorite colors are blue and green she opted for the first pair. I love the result.

Baroque Tahitian pearls set as traditional stud earrings