Chenai’s first trip to the Hong Kong Jewelry Show

When the opportunity to go to Hong Kong presented itself, I took the chance and did not look back!  Within the next 24 hours, my air ticket and hotel were booked and I had arranged child care. It was decided, before the trip, that I would look for the wish list items.

I slept for most of my 15-hour flight so I arrived in Hong Kong well rested and ready for the task at hand. Since my flight arrived early morning the first day of the show, Jeremy and Hisano met me at the airport and we were off to the show! After spending almost an hour in a Disneyland-like line, I got my badge and was official! We entered the Pearls hall and was quite overwhelmed at the size of the room. So many pearls! So much to see! Thankfully, Jeremy and Hisano have been doing this for a long time so I did not feel so overwhelmed.

Pearls Hall - HK Blog With a long to-do list, we wanted to make sure we didn’t waste any time. We spent the first day buying Akoya pearls and a Tahitian loose pearl lot. It was such a thrill to watch Jeremy and Hisano negotiate with the suppliers. We had to walk away from one vendor because of their high prices, went to the booth across from them and purchased most of our Akoya pearl strands!  I also picked out a golden South Sea strand from the wish list. We left the show feeling quite accomplished! Headed to the hotel, checked in and got ready for dinner.

Day 2 and half of Day 3 was spent doing quality control on Freshwater strands. The rest of Day 3 and all of day 4 (last day) was spent filling the gaps and gathering the wish list items (my main objective). My list included pistachio Akoya pearls, white metallic Freshadama strands, a multicolor Edison strand and graduated freshwater necklace in pink (Batman style). The first thing I learned while going through wish list is how difficult it is to find the pearls on my list. Quickly realizing why it is a “wish” list. Sometimes, it seemed as though I was looking for a unicorn!  So many vendors, so many pearls to look through, in search of that needle in a haystack. If I was lucky enough to find what I was looking, the price had to be just right!

Pistachio Akoya

True pistachio akoya are so rare!

Pink Batman necklace

One wish list item was a pink “Batman” graduated strand – I needed to match large center pearls

I learned so much about the buying process. Seeing how difficult it can be to get pearls in the quality that we have come to be known for at a price that makes our customers happy. I had a great time in Hong Kong. I explored the night market with Mike and Sherri and shared a lot of giggles with Blaire (all and Ruckus friends) and ate some Amazing food!


Hisano and Jeremy love Din Tai Fung

Some of our amazing finds will be in some upcoming sales including the Black Friday sale!

White Metallic pearls

You can see the REAL metallics mixed in – metallic is metallic (as Jeremy says)

Vietnamese Akoya strands and loose pearls

Our friends that farm akoya in Vietnam had a special hidden stash just for Hisano

Colorful Tahitian drop lot

This lot was yummy! It has so many rare colors!

My love affair with Tahitian Pearls continues

2014 could definitely be described as the year of Tahitians for us. We were fortunate to find a few amazing lots of dark peacock drops and colorful rounds, some of the most amazing Tahitians I’ve ever come across in sizable, workable and graded lots.

We also had a lot of fun with Tahitians, working with a new type of baroque Tahitian pearl and getting creating with harvest strands. I don’t know how many of those harvest strands I made in September and October but it was a lot.

As some of my friends and clients know, this year I am keeping my eyes out for lighter, yet still colorful lots. While dark peacock Tahitians are the most valuable of all, I’ve gotten a lot of requests for lighter drop strands and pastels so we are on it!

The first drop lot in was smaller than I had hoped, so most of the strands are multis, but I think we’re on the right color-track :)

Drop multicolor Tahitian strands1

multicolor Tahitian pearls

When I picked up this lot there was also another lot available in a shape of pearl that I haven’t done whole lot with in the past but decided I shouldn’t let this lot pass up. The pearls are slight ovals to semi-baroque, all A and A/B grade (which translates to AA+/AAA and AAA for us) in great colors.

The resulting strands appear round, but that slightly off-round shape cuts the cost dramatically and adds the extra curvature that results in those extra colorful overtones.

Oval Tahitian pearl strands

I love Tahitian pearls!


Tahitian Pearl Blues

We had a lot of fun with Tahitian pearls this year. In September we released a huge lot of dark peacock drop strands, something we had never done or been able to do before. The next month was the Connoisseur Sale, but we could have called it the Harvest Strand month given the number of them we made. But I decided to hold something back – something special to release on Cyber Monday – the special Rikitea rounds.

Rikitea is known throughout the Tahitian pearl industry as the source for the best colors of Tahiti. The finest cherries, peacocks and dark blues overwhelmingly come from Rikitea.

Dark Blue Tahitian Strands

Dark Blue Tahitian Strands

We have a total of 51 selected strands that we are going to start adding to the site today and this week. They aren’t going to featured, they’ll just be added to our Round Tahitian Strands page.

What we’ve done though, is add a hidden tag on each of the strands. Starting today, if you search our site for the term Rikitea, you’ll see the strands.

Be sure to watch for the email we send out on Cyber Monday, which will contain a site-wide Pearl Point code which you can use toward any of these strands.

A Rainbow of Rikitea Colors

Tahitian Blues and Cherry

Tahitian Harvest Strands

Two months ago I received the first request for a Tahitian “Harvest” strand. It’s something we’ve been encouraged to make for some time, but there are usually so many different things I “want” to work on and I rarely get to them all.

It was decided by the team that we would make a few of these strands for the September Connoisseur event, so when a request came in for something special in July, I decided to take the reigns personally. Fast-forward two months later and I believe we’ve made a total of 22 strands, and I’ve personally made most of them.

What is trending as a “harvest strand” is a strand of pearls that represents what one would expect to find in a real pearl harvest. When you can appreciate the beauty of one of these strands, it’s even easier to appreciate the effort put in to grow these pearls and match them into graded strands.

Three-row Tahitian pearl harvest strand Sep 11 2014 lp copy

Finding a three-strand clasp that would work for something this massive is not an easy task so we did the only thing we could – make a clasp from scratch. On a good note, however, this gave us the ability to customize it and add an extender so the strand can be worn short or long with all the pearls showing. You probably noticed the space between the strands above as well. This is so when the strand is being worn long, the inner strands don’t overtake the outer and overlap.

Three-row Tahitian harvest

And just for fun, I made one “harvest” strand of freshwater pearls just to see how it would come out. I used a lot of really special keshi, metallics, ripples and even souffle pearls in this one. It was a fun piece.

Freshwater Harvest Strand

I am thinking of hanging up the harvest strand hat for a while, but my good friend Josh Humbert of Kamoka Pearls had a good idea when he was here last month — a vault strand. Now that could get dangerous!

Hisano and I are hopping on a plane to Hong Kong and should be airborne within the hour!

Effecting Change, with Josh Humbert of Kamoka Pearls

Continuing with the video series from the 2014 Pearl-Guide Ruckus in Palos Verdes, here is Josh Humbert of Kamoka Pearls giving a presentation about his life on a Tahitian pearl farm and about effecting change with sustainable pearl farming.